If your Cannabis plants haven’t flowered, there’s no need to

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If your cannabis plants aren’t showing any signs of flowering by their ‘due date’ don’t worry. There’s usually a simple explanation and a few adjustments should see things change very much for the better.

Most of today’s cannabis plants are photoperiod varieties, which means they will begin to flower based on specific changes to lighting conditions.

Because most cannabis plants are grown indoors, we have total control over the growing and flowering stages.

Some of you prefer to crop regularly, but with smaller harvests, while others prefer to maximise plant size and yield, for one large harvest.

Most cannabis plants will flower when you switch to a lighting regime of 12 hours on and twelve hours off. Delaying that switch enables plants to continue growing, while advancing the timing will see earlier flowering from smaller plants.

So, what could be going on that has stopped your plants from flowering when they should?
Is there any additional light getting into your grow room or grow tent? It doesn’t take a lot of light to interrupt the plant’s metamorphosis.

Try dropping the temperature a few degrees to mimic the arrival of autumn and reduce humidity as well. Cut lighting down to ten or eleven hours to hoodwink the plant further.

You could go full-on drastic and plunge your plants into total darkness for up to 48 hours, before resuming the 12 hours’ on and off light cycle.

Of course, it can be as simple as a plant not being ready to flower, as some strains take longer than others to transition from the growing phase.

Dare one ask if you are absolutely sure that the plants are not male? Remember, it is only female cannabis plants that flower.

If you have grown autoflowering plants, it may just be that you’ve been unlucky, and the plant’s internal mechanism has failed. If that’s the case, then treat them as though they are not autoflowering and trigger a 12 hours’ on and off lighting cycle.

As we say, if your cannabis plants haven’t flowered, there’s either a good reason, or something you can still do to change the situation.

Let us know if you’ve experienced any problems flowering cannabis plants in the comment section below, and of course if you enjoyed this video make sure to like and subscribe so you too can become a cannabis expert!

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